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Tag Archives: crime

Review: House Broken

Review: House Broken

Title: House Broken
Author: Sonja Yoerg
Published: 2015
Length: 325 pages

My star rating: ★ ★ ★ ★

After her mother is badly injured in a drunk-driving accident, Geneva Novak reluctantly take her in while she recovers. Geneva resents her mother’s irresponsible behavior as well as her attitude towards her and tries to sober her up, but Helen is relentless in her pursuit of the numbing powers of alcohol. Her most painful memories have nothing to do with the car wreck, however, but rather with her unhappy marriage and secrets that she’s kept–and drowned in liquor–for decades. Her presence in the Novak household threatens to upend both Geneva’s childhood memories and her entire family in ways that none of them could have ever anticipated.

Note: this review is mostly spoiler-free. I’ve included some spoilers in my Goodreads review.

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Review: Mafia Girl

Review: Mafia Girl

Title: Mafia Girl
Author: Deborah Blumenthal
Published: 2014
Length: 270 pages

My star rating: ★ ★ ★ ½

After Gia and her best friend get pulled over for speeding, she finds herself falling for her arresting officer, Michael. The only problem? Gia is the seventeen-year-old daughter of a New York City mafia boss, which means that law enforcement is off-limits. Her feelings don’t go away, but she soon has more to worry about than a crush. Her dad’s business gets her teased and harassed at school and sometimes even puts her life–and that of her friends and family–in danger. However, when the law threatens to catch up with him at last, Gia must come to terms with how much different her life could be without her father in it.

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Review: Shallow Graves

Review: Shallow Graves

Title: Shallow Graves
Author: Kali Wallace
Published: 2016
Length: 358 pages

My star rating: ★ ★ ★ ½

When Breezy wakes up in her own grave a year after being murdered, she has no memory of who killed her or how. She knows only that she now has the abilities to both detect the presence of murderers and to kill them with a touch. After some experimentation, she also realizes that she cannot die–properly–a second time. Unable to go home, she heads west looking for answers. She discovers along the way that she is far from the only non-human entity trying to make it in a human world–and that there are humans who will go to great lengths to destroy them.

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Review: Game

Review: Game

Title: Game
Author: Barry Lyga
Published: 2013
Length: 517 pages

My star rating: ★ ★ ★

In this sequel to I Hunt Killers, seventeen-year-old Jasper Dent continues to struggle with his identity as the son of an infamous (and now escaped) serial killer. Having helped apprehend the Impressionist in his own small town, Jazz now finds himself working with the NYPD and the FBI chase the “Hat-Dog” killer in New York City after the killer scrawled his name on a victim’s body. Meanwhile, his girlfriend Connie gets involved in a very different way. Tired of being passed over and left out, she throws caution to the wind in hopes of making her own impact on the case.

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Review: The Darkest Evening of the Year

Review: The Darkest Evening of the Year

Title: The Darkest Evening of the Year
Author: Dean Koontz
Published: 2007
Length: 461 pages

My star rating: ★ ★

This book came with the recommendation of a dear friend; I wish I had liked it better.

The back cover also declares it to be “Silence of the Lambs meets Marley & Me.”

As someone who counts Silence as one of their all-time favorites (in terms of both story and characters), let me tell you: this was nothing like it, except that dogs featured in both. Also, crazy people–though Koontz’s variety were pretty sub-par.

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Review: Nightmares and Dreamscapes

Review: Nightmares and Dreamscapes

Title: Nightmares & Dreamscapes
Author: Stephen King
Published: 1993
Length: 816 pages (including an introduction and notes)

My star rating: ★ ★ ★ ★

At the beginning of this particular anthology, Stephen King briefly discusses his childhood beliefs, and invites readers to join him while they peruse stories that will be “a little frightening.” He assures them that “we’ll be alright if we go together.” And he leaves them with a “catechism” to start them on the right track:

I believe that there really is a Santa Claus, and that all those red-suited guys you see at Christmastime really are his helpers.

I believe there is an unseen world all around us. …

Most of all, I do believe in spooks, I do believe in spooks, I do believe in spooks.

Okay? Ready? Fine. Here’s my hand. We’re going now. I know the way. All you have to do is hold on tight…and believe.

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